The Shorter Version of a Dream

During the Sadat era, he lost many of his friends to Salafi organizations. He recalls vividly being called “kafir” by an old friend while the friend’s mother pled with him: “Yousief, Yousief, forgive him—he makes our life miserable too.” Baba kept walking, and between that and the metal factory and no college degree, it was time to move on.

Stories on a Mirror

For "Arrivals and Departures: the Journeys of the Copts and their Artifacts," attendees were invited to reflect on their journeys, write a short note, and then place it on a mirror for the next participant to reflect and add upon; like ships passing in the night. These ephemeral memories stuck to a mirror only briefly, now transformed to a digital medium and retold, carry with them the experiences of Coptic emigres who’ve come to call Canada home.

Coptic Canadian Women Discuss (Special Episode) Part 2

Welcome back for part 2 of Coptic Canadian Women Discuss. Join Meray Metias and her friends as they tackle how they navigate their gender within the Church; how they negotiate their multiple identities within family, community, and social circles; and, they share their thoughts on how Coptic churches can maintain a relationship with Coptic Canadian youth. At the heart of their stories of adaptation, lay a common inter-generational struggle as immigrants and their children work to strike a balance between two worlds.

Scholars Discuss (Special): Episode 3

We hope you find this discussion educational and are motivated to help preserve the history and heritage of your communities for future generations. Archival preservation offers many benefits to you, your family, your community, your city, and to our collective understanding of diverse immigrant communities that have, and continue to contribute to these many places we now call 'home.'

Scholars Discuss Coptic Studies: Episode 2

In this episode, Joseph Youssef (PhD candidate in Anthropology, University of Toronto) kindly shares his history and his experiences with us, as an Egyptian immigrant to Toronto and an anthropologist of Coptic monasticism in Egypt and its diasporas. His fascinating research sheds light on the pitfalls of mythologizing and romanticizing monks. Rather, as he argues, we must understand their humanity and appreciate how modernization continues to affect their spiritual lives.

Chaplaincy and Coptic Contributions to Christian Theology

To paraphrase St. Athanasius, fourth century bishop of Alexandria, Christ became human so humanity can become God. This essential point marks how all humans can be united in endeavoring for unity and prosperity. My understanding of this contribution by St. Athanasius to Christian theology is vital to my own growth and continues to inform my holistic approach as a chaplain.

Scholars Discuss Coptic Studies: Episode 1 (Part 2)

In part 2, our guests begin with the contested topics of Coptic identity and the political involvement of Coptic populations in Egypt, Canada, and the United States. They then delve into the challenges of emotion and subjectivity in conducting fieldwork, the obligation of scholars to become engaged in ongoing violence against Egypt's Coptic communities, and the effects of such developments on the collection of data and access to research materials in Egypt and its diaspora. Candace and Michael conclude by offering advice to those interested in pursuing similar research.

Scholars Discuss Coptic Studies: Episode 1 (Part 1)

Welcome to the first episode of "Scholars Discuss Coptic Studies," presented by the Coptic Canadian History Project (CCHP). This audio blog series aims to bring together junior and established scholars from across North America and to offer insight on the research being conducted on Coptic populations around the world. Our host and facilitator for this episode is Essam Iskander, translator and interpreter for the Diocese of New York and New England. He is joined by Candace Lukasik (PhD candidate in Anthropology, UC Berkley) and Michael Akladios (PhD candidate in History, York University).

Pursuing Freedom with Coptic Theology

Since I was the first to go into Philosophy and Religion, I was usually labeled as different, liberal, often controversial, and sometimes idealistic. That certainly affected my faith and spiritual life in Orthodoxy. I began to gravitate toward the friendly environment of free inquiry and understanding of faith in the academic context of theological education.