Interview with Michael Akladios: Mundane Transnationalism

Future projects share a common goal: to contend that though national, ethnic, and religious identities have shaped people’s lives in powerful ways, immigrants based their actions on a selective reading of such ideologies that was most often expressed in choices to live their own kind of transcultural lives.

Interview with Candace Lukasik: Transnational Anxieties

How did you get started in the discipline of Anthropology? What drew you to your research topic? I believe as scholars, we are drawn to questions that are built up over a lifetime. Such questions that move us are, in many ways, a genealogy of ourselves and our life experiences. I first visited Egypt in … Continue reading Interview with Candace Lukasik: Transnational Anxieties

Researching Modern Coptic History: A Guide to the Archives in the US and Egypt

In an effort to support our colleagues researching Copts across disciplines, we have generated a list of archives in the United States and Egypt that are open to scholars. This general overview in no way claims to be an exhaustive list of archival repositories on modern Coptic history, but rather an introduction to some significant collections for researchers interested in consulting primary sources.

Interview with Dr. Angie Heo: “Defamiliarizing the Familiar”

How did you get started in the anthropological profession?  What drew you to the subject matter of your first book? Back when I was a freshman in college, I was trying to figure out what major suited me, and a senior in my dorm gave me a helpful piece of advice. She suggested that I … Continue reading Interview with Dr. Angie Heo: “Defamiliarizing the Familiar”

Beyond Persecution: The Copts in Egypt’s Twentieth Century

In this recorded public history lecture, Michael Akladios speaks of Copts in Egypt and contrasts the democratic promise of the early twentieth century with the rise of discrimination and harassment, leading eventually to persistent persecution of numerical, linguistic, racial, and/or religious minorities by a dominant majority that is institutionalized by the state.

Dr. Gaétan Du Roy: “Everyday Interactions”

I try to explain that Copts are not Western Christians lost in the Middle East, or living relics of “one of the oldest Church in the World.” At the same time, I don’t want to minimize the violence and discrimination Copts suffer. It is an exercise at equilibrium which is sometimes difficult.