Welcome to your Digital Cafe! The CCHP warmly invites you to join us as we sit and share stories that reflect the history, heritage, and collective memory of Egypt’s Coptic population and its diaspora. Explore our Scholar’s Corner blog and then head over to view a collection of Immigrants’ Stories. This is your space to read, contribute, and share in a diversity of opinions and activities which color the experiences of Coptic populations in the Middle East and North Africa, Europe, North America, and their descendants.


The Scholar’s Corner is a monthly blog that is collaborative and community driven. We host multimedia articles by an interdisciplinary group of academics on diverse topics related to the movements and migrations of Coptic populations. This space provides established and junior scholars an opportunity to introduce themselves and their research to their peers and the general public. Your submissions will help to educate others and will be promoted widely on our social media platforms and through our partners. Email your submissions to: theCCHP@gmail.com.

Guidelines 

  1. Contributions are intended for an interdisciplinary and public audience; readers range from students to professionals involved in the social sciences, humanities, fine arts, and other areas. Posts must contain a minimum of academic jargon to facilitate maximum communication.
  2. Readers tend to look for some discussion of the author’s background and motivations. A brief resume of your work, the major areas covered, and the aims are usually appreciated.
  3. Writing style is an important aspect of the ability to communicate; aim for clear prose, brevity, and concision. The typical word count is 1,000 to 1,400 words.
  4. Multimedia posts are highly encouraged to engage our audience. Please include images and hyperlinks for our readers to pursue further information at their convenience.
  5. Prompt responses make authors, publishers, and readers happy. Our posts appear only once per month, which provides us with less frequent opportunities to publish. We do our best to review submissions quickly; we appreciate contributors submitting posts promptly.
  6. The writer must be aware of cultural sensitivities and shall not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality, or culture.
  7. The overall citation format follows the Chicago Manual of Style guidelines. Please include endnotes and a brief biographical note with your submission.

Disclaimers

  1. Contributors agree to give the CCHP online publication rights for any submitted material. Copyright remains with the author.
  2. We reserve the right to edit any submitted materials for publication. Edited versions will be returned to authors for their review.
  3. We reserve the right to hold, kill or push a post forward to a subsequent date if needed.

Immigrants’ Stories is a collaborative portal that invites the general public to participate in promoting and preserving the experiences of ‘ordinary’ Copts. The CCHP involves the collection of immigrant stories and images from all Coptic populations. We hope that each participant will bring forward stories and memories of their immigrant experience (or that of their parent/grandparent). Your direct participation will leave something new for future generations. Please contact us (theCCHP@gmail.com) with your submissions.

Guidelines

  1. The short stories (2-3 paragraphs) may be accompanied by a childhood photograph of you or with a special memento that you either brought with you from your place of birth, or that was important to you in your journey or settlement.
  2. Each story should have a title, first name (pseudonyms are fine), city (optional), state/province, and country. We will accept stories in English or Arabic. Please use Times New Roman (12 pts. font).
  3. We want to hear your story about how you or your family came to live in North America. Maybe you’re a recent immigrant or perhaps your story looks back across generations. Please include introspection (meaning that we want to know what you thought or how you felt.) Some questions to ponder include:
  • What brought you to North America?
  • What was your journey like?
  • What was life like for you in your place of birth? What is it like now?
  • What hopes, fears, and challenges have you faced?
  • What do you want us to know?
  1. Your contact information will not be shared with anyone outside of this project.

Don’t feel like writing? Just find the voice recorder or camera app on your phone and tell us your story, as you would in a conversation. Then email it to theCCHP@gmail.com.

Thank you for your support of the Coptic Canadian History Project.  We look forward to reading your submissions.

Editors


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Michael Akladios is completing his PhD at York University on the immigrant experience of diverse Coptic communities in post-Second World War Toronto, Montreal, and New York. Over the course of his PhD Michael has become particularly interested in questions around the influence of the Coptic renaissance on emigre populations, the role of ecumenical movements in the formation of Coptic institutions in North America, and the politicization of collective memory. Michael is the Founder and Project Manager of the Coptic Canadian History Project (CCHP).


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Miray Philips was born in Egypt, grew up in Kuwait, and moved to the United States to pursue higher education. She is currently a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She broadly studies identity and collective memory in response to conflict. Her current research is more specifically focused on how Coptic populations in Egypt, Kuwait, and the US make sense of, and respond to, sectarianism in Egypt.

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